Five ways to stop worring about injuries and start doing something about them.

American businesses spend more than $1 billion a week on workplace injuries, according to the Liberty Mutual Workplace Injury Survey.  A company that can’t get injuries under control may pay for it in:

  • Higher workers comp costs,
  • Increased OSHA recordables, which may threaten their ability to work for customers,
  • Lost productivity, and
  • potentially higher health care costs if injuries manifest themselves in other health problems.

No wonder so many businesses worry about injuries.   But there is a difference between worrying and doing something about it.  The key is to put a managemernt system in place to prevent and reduce the impact of injuries.  Recently we developed a paper that identifies steps companies can take to start managing injuries in an effective, systematic way.  Click here to access the paper:  CORE Health Bulletin – Five Essential Elements of a Safety Management System.

Lifeline Strategies works with CORE Occupational Medicine, a leading provider of workplace medical and testing services.  Want to learn more? Contact us at info@lifelinesrategies.com.

Why Getting In Workers’ Heads May Be Key to Reducing Injury Impact

When many companies think about managing workplace injuries, they may think about OSHA reporting rules, light duty and avoiding litigation, but the real key to improving outcomes and holding down costs is to get inside the worker’s head, according to a new study.

A white paper looks at the RMS Workers’ Compensation Benchmarking Study for 2016, which asked companies to rank the biggest obstacles to improving claim outcomes.   The number one obstacle wasn’t lawsuits, return-to-work problems or late reporting of injuries (although those were high on the list).  The top problem was addressing what the study calls “Psychosocial Roadblocks.” Continue reading “Why Getting In Workers’ Heads May Be Key to Reducing Injury Impact”

Forget What Your Safety Manual Says About Injury Management – What Does OSHA Say?

A lot of companies have a safety manual that they bought from a service or maybe it was written by some previous safety manager and tends to be updated only when things change.   Over time, we tend to accept our written policies and procedures without looking at what they are supposed to accomplish.   Managing workplace injuries is one of those areas.  So just to take a fresh look at the issue, let’s go back to what the OSHA regulations actually say about managing injuries.  It is found in the  Medical Services and First Aid Standard (29 CFR 1910.151).  It is very simple and very clear:

1910.151(a)  The employer shall ensure the ready availability of medical personnel for advice and consultation on matters of plant health.

1910.151(b) In the absence of an infirmary, clinic, or hospital in near proximity to the workplace which is used for the treatment of all injured employees, a person or persons shall be adequately trained to render first aid. Adequate first aid supplies shall be readily available.

Continue reading “Forget What Your Safety Manual Says About Injury Management – What Does OSHA Say?”