5 Steps to Effective Injury Management – Blog Post From ASSE

Let me share with you a blog that I provided to the American Society of Safety Engineers on some best practices to consider as you set up an injury management program.  You can find the full post here.

I am a strong believer that safety departments do a much better job on the prevention side than in reducing the extent of injuries after they happen.  What many don’t fully understand is that there is a cost to injuries, but a failure to address the injury properly after it happens can make that cost skyrocket. Continue reading “5 Steps to Effective Injury Management – Blog Post From ASSE”

Safety Speech: Why The First Half Hour After An Injury Is So Important.

COREHEALTHlogo (2)If you are in Houston, please come to the next STEPS meeting on Tuesday, May 17th.  We will be featured speakers talking about what you should do in the first half hour after a worker is injured on the job.   Study after study show that the actions you take right after an incident play a large role in determining whether the worker will receive the right treatment, whether the worker winds up on workers comp and how long he or she may stay off the job.   CORE Health Networks will also answer your questions on how to interpret OSHA reporting requirements from a medical professional’s standpoint.

STEPS is a national partnership between OSHA and the oil and gas industry, dedicated to sharing information and best practices on safety and occupational health.  The next Houston STEPS meeting will be held from

8:00am-11:00am

at

Groves Industrial Supply

7301 Pinemont Dr., Houston, TX 77040

owever, because we are expecting a good-sized group this month, please let me know if you are interested in coming by emailing info@lifelinestrategies.com.

Also, if you are interested in having CORE Health Networks speak to any groups that you are involved in or if you just want to discuss strategies for addressing worker injuries, contact me with that request as well.

Occupational Health – Knee ACL Reconstruction Has High Rate of Re-injury

Credit:  St. Louis Children's Hospital
Credit: St. Louis Children’s Hospital

The goals of a good workplace health management program are to make sure that workers are not assigned to job duties where the risk of injury is high and to make sure they have timely and proper treatment if there is an injury.

New research shows there is good statistical reason to take a close look at new employees who have had Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (ACLR) surgery on a knee or at employees returning to work after that injury. A new study of soldiers in the British Army has just been released.    Apparently, prior to 2005,  ACL surgery was a cause for discharge or rejection, but after 2005, the Brits changed their recruitment policies to allow enlistees who had previously undergone ACL surgery.   As a followup, they wanted to find out whether those recruits went on to experience additional knee problems.   The study compared recruits who had ACL surgery with a control group who had not had the surgery (and we assume, had not had knee problems).  It found that “Sixty-one per cent of cases experienced complications linked to their previous surgery.”

Another, earlier study had looked at young athletes who had ACLR surgery.  It found that about 69% of them experienced a re-injury.

What does this mean to employers?  Well, first you need to recognize that military surgery and sports are likely to place special stress on knees.  Most jobs don’t create that kind of physical stress.   But some do.  There are two lessons here:

  1. It is important to understand job duties and make sure new hires or employees returning to work can perform those duties without risking additional injury.
  2. It is important to document pre-existing conditions or surgeries.   Depending on the severity and where the operation takes place, an ACL operation can cost $20,000-50,000.

If you want to learn more about the onboarding process as practiced by CORE Health Networks, contact me at kwells@corehealthnet.com.

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Worker injuries and mistrust: Why the first few minutes after an incident are so important.

taller de ilustracion digital - 212Near the end of his shift, a warehouse worker lifts a box while talking to a co-worker.  He’s distracted and doesn’t remember to lift with his legs.  He feels a twinge in his back and by 10 o’clock that night, the pain is so bad he can’t sleep.

Want to know one of the top factors that will determine how soon he is back on the job?   Whether he is afraid of losing his job.

The Workers Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) surveyed injured workers in 12 states.  It found that trust, or rather mistrust, of the company and fear of losing their jobs was strongly related to workers staying off the job longer.  In fact, the study found that “concerns about being fired were associated with a four-week increase in the average duration of disability.”  Workers who were afraid of being fired also were much more dissatisfied with the care they received and had more problems with access to care.

There is a very good recap of the study here in CFO Magazine.

Why is this important?  Time off the job is a cost to the company and shows up as OSHA recordables. Workers who don’t trust their employers may also be more likely to sue.  More importantly however, getting workers back to where they can earn a living is a priority.  Good companies understand the value of keeping a productive, engaged workforce.  A high level of distrust and workers feeling like the company doesn’t support them if they are injured can destroy a company culture.

What you can do about it.  The article gives a number of valuable tips.  On the front end, companies should engage workers in identifying hazards and avoiding them as a part of their overall safety program.   They should also plan ahead by identifying transitional jobs that allow workers to return to work without risking their recovery.

One of the biggest recommendations is something that is at the heart of CORE Health Network’s approach – Early intervention by trained professionals who can make sure that worker know they will be taken care of with appropriate, timely treatment.  Here is what the article on the study says:

Providing a 24/7 nurse triage program to speed treatment for injured employees so they get the care they need as soon as possible. The employee can contact the nurse triage line immediately after feeling a twinge of pain or sustaining an injury that doesn’t require emergency treatment. This service not only ensures the employee gets the right care immediately, it also cuts down on unnecessary visits to the physician when the employee can use such self-care treatments as ice, rest, elevation, or (over the counter Ibuprofen).

If you need more information on the early intervention offered by Core Health Network, contact us at info@lifelinestrategies.com.