Three Weeks Until Deadline for OSHA Electronic Recordkeeping…Or Not!

OSHA has said that its new requirement for companies to submit injury and illness reports electronically kicks in on December 1.   But before we get into that, a quick question:

What is a leading cause of safety failures when we institute changes in the workplace?  How about that we fail to communicate the changes to the people on the ground who actually have to implement them?

Keep that in mind as we look at the weird, convoluted path this new requirement is taking.   Continue reading “Three Weeks Until Deadline for OSHA Electronic Recordkeeping…Or Not!”

Keeping Volunteers Safe During Hurricane Recovery Efforts

I had not seen a good plain English guide for volunteers who come into a hurricane area to do recovery work, so I combined a lot of OSHA and industry tips into one document: Hurricane crew safety.   I hope it is helpful.

Here in Houston, people are starting to put their lives back together.  With more than 185,000 homes damaged on the Gulf Coast, recovery will take a while.   Now Irma threatens to impact thousands of people in Florida.

Continue reading “Keeping Volunteers Safe During Hurricane Recovery Efforts”

Half Of Your Most Expensive Workers Comp Cases May Be Misdiagnosed!

How much of your company budget for workplace injuries is going to fix injuries that are misdiagnosed in the initial phase? A new study by a consulting group called “Best Doctors” estimates that more than 20% of on-the-job injuries may be misdiagnosed and that number climbs to 50% for the most expensive workers compensation case.   All told, the group believes that American industry spends $15 billion a year on cases that were misdiagnosed.  You can review the study here.

Here are a few of the ways that Best Doctors says misdiagnosis costs companies: Continue reading “Half Of Your Most Expensive Workers Comp Cases May Be Misdiagnosed!”

Why Getting In Workers’ Heads May Be Key to Reducing Injury Impact

When many companies think about managing workplace injuries, they may think about OSHA reporting rules, light duty and avoiding litigation, but the real key to improving outcomes and holding down costs is to get inside the worker’s head, according to a new study.

A white paper looks at the RMS Workers’ Compensation Benchmarking Study for 2016, which asked companies to rank the biggest obstacles to improving claim outcomes.   The number one obstacle wasn’t lawsuits, return-to-work problems or late reporting of injuries (although those were high on the list).  The top problem was addressing what the study calls “Psychosocial Roadblocks.” Continue reading “Why Getting In Workers’ Heads May Be Key to Reducing Injury Impact”